A saltwater crocodile has been spotted walking in a carpark in the Kakadu National Park


Tradie gets the shock of his life when he spots a four-metre saltwater crocodile and a feral pig on the nature strip of a car park

  • A massive saltwater croc has been spotted in a car park in Kakadu National Park
  • Marine mechanic Dayne Kopp said the reptile came within 10 metres of his ute
  • This is the second sighting of the monster croc that continues to haunt the area
  • Rangers have warned recent flooding means more crocodiles are in the park 

The incredible moment a saltwater crocodile casually walks through a car park in a national park has been caught on camera. 

Tradesman Dayne Kopp was pulling into the car park in the remote Kakadu National Park on Tuesday morning, when he spotted a feral pig, closely followed by a saltwater crocodile. 

Mr Kopp told Daily Mail Australia he ‘hopped back into the car pretty quick’ when the monster croc came within ten metres of his ute.  

Local tradesman Dayne Kopp first saw a feral pig in the car park followed by a four metre saltwater crocodile (above) which sat on the grass for a while before slithering into the river

Local tradesman Dayne Kopp first saw a feral pig in the car park followed by a four metre saltwater crocodile (above) which sat on the grass for a while before slithering into the river

When he had established a safe distance, Mr Kopp said he went closer to the crocodile on the nearby grass, where the reptile sat for a while before slithering back into the river.  

Mr Kopp said he visits the National Park frequently for his work with DMK Marine Mechanics, servicing the boats on the river which he describes as ‘full of crocs’.

The marine mechanic said he had seen his fair share of saltwater crocodiles in the wild, but had never seen one in a car park. 

Mr Kopp told NTNews the situation could have been dangerous if the reptile had been acting more aggressively. 

‘There was a pig already in the car park, and maybe the croc had been watching it come into the car park … but that could have been a kid coming out of the passenger seat of a car, as an easy meal,’ he said. 

This is the most recent sighting of the same saltwater crocodile that was previously spotted by a park ranger crossing a dirt road in the Northern Territory National Park. 

The croc appeared to have something between it’s jaws, which online commentators speculated was a small animal, most likely a pig or a dog. 

Jenny Hunter and her partner Andy Ralph filmed the monster croc from the safety of their vehicle, and posted the footage online to warn local communities in the area.

The remote Kakadu National Park (above) in the Northern Territory is home to a population of 10,000 freshwater and saltwater crocodiles

The remote Kakadu National Park (above) in the Northern Territory is home to a population of 10,000 freshwater and saltwater crocodiles

‘Remember, just about every creek, culvert and waterhole in Kakadu has a croc in it during the wet season – so be on the lookout and stay safe,’ he wrote.

Rangers in the Kakadu area have recently put up warning signs about the risks from crocodiles after moderate flooding earlier in January. 

Breeding season for saltwater crocodiles runs through November to April and means the reptiles will behave more aggressively to defend their territory or nesting area.

Kakadu National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage protected area about 170km southeast of Darwin. 

The National Park has a population of about 10,000 crocodiles which are either freshwater, growing to three metres long, or saltwater, which can grow to six metres and weigh more than a tonne. 

How to be croc-wise at Kakadu

Saltwater crocodiles inhabit most areas of water in Kakadu National Park, including floodplains, freshwater billabongs, creeks, rivers and coastal areas

Always obey warning signs and assume crocodiles are always present

Avoid the waters edge, with children and pets always at a greater risk

Camp at least 50 metres from the waters edge and 2 metres above the high water mark

Be extra vigilant during the breeding season (November to April) when crocodiles defend a territory or nesting mound and become more aggressive

Source: Parks Australia



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