World

Waterspout spotted off the coast of Maroubra Beach

Swimmer videos rare weather event off the coast of a popular Sydney beach – so why was there a ‘tornado’ so close to the city?

  •  Rare weather event spotted off Maroubra Beach in Sydney’s eastern suburbs 
  •  Kasia Kapusta, 43, captured the unusual ‘water tornado’ on Tuesday morning 
  •  The event known as a ‘waterspout’ is a wind vortex that scoops up water vapour










A rare weather phenomenon has left onlookers stunned after a ‘water tornado’ was spotted off the coast of a popular suburban beach. 

Kasia Kapusta, 43, saw the spinning column of water travelling across the ocean at Maroubra Beach in Sydney’s eastern suburbs at around 10.40am on Tuesday. 

The ‘incredible’ event began to form after rainclouds began to float towards the beach. 

A rare weather phenomenon has left onlookers stunned after a 'water tornado' was spotted along the coast of a popular suburban beach

A waterspout was spotted travelling across Maroubra beach on Tuesday morning

A rare weather phenomenon has left onlookers stunned after a ‘water tornado’ was spotted along the coast of a popular suburban beach

‘I’ve been living in Maroubra for five years and it’s the first time I’ve ever seen anything like it,’ she told Daily Mail Australia. 

‘It was quite unusual as it was a beautiful morning and it only started raining at about midday when the clouds started to come in.’

The unusual weather event is called a ‘waterspout’ – a type of wind vortex that develops over masses of water, scooping up vapour and dragging it towards the sky.  

A BoM spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia that the smaller scale, benign waterspouts are less dangerous for beachgoers. 

The unusual weather event is called a 'waterspout' - a type of wind vortex that develops over masses of water, scooping up vapour and dragging it towards the sky

The unusual weather event is called a ‘waterspout’ – a type of wind vortex that develops over masses of water, scooping up vapour and dragging it towards the sky

‘Cool, unstable air masses passing over the warmer waters allow vigorous updraughts to form, which can tighten up into a spinning column,’ the spokesperson said. 

‘The cool, moist air usually supports a full condensation funnel.’ 

The slender tornados are occasionally found in the late summer and autumn and can be dangerous for boaters and shoreline locations but are no threat farther inland since they collapse soon after they move onshore. 

Kasia Kapusta, 43, who has been living in Maroubra for five years had 'never seen anything like it'

Kasia Kapusta, 43, who has been living in Maroubra for five years had ‘never seen anything like it’


Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button