Hospital patients with Covid are now younger and get less sick


Hospital patients with Covid are now younger and get less sick as expert says vaccines have ‘broken the chain’ between infections and serious illness

  • NHS chief Chris Hopson said there is evidence vaccines had ‘broken the chain’ 
  • People ending up in hospital was consistently lower than in previous waves 
  • Health Secretary Matt Hancock described hospitalisations as ‘relatively flat’ 










Patients admitted to hospital with Covid-19 are now younger, get less sick and go home sooner, experts have revealed.

Chris Hopson, chief executive of NHS Providers, said there was ‘very significant’ evidence vaccines had ‘broken the chain’ between infection and hospitalisation.

The number of people ending up in hospital was consistently lower than in previous waves, with NHS leaders in virus hotspots reporting declining inpatient numbers, he revealed.

It comes as Health Secretary Matt Hancock described hospitalisations as ‘relatively flat’ – despite rising cases

It comes as Health Secretary Matt Hancock described hospitalisations as ‘relatively flat’ – despite rising cases

Hospital leaders reported that community infection and Covid inpatient numbers were declining in hotspots

Hospital leaders reported that community infection and Covid inpatient numbers were declining in hotspots

It comes as Health Secretary Matt Hancock described hospitalisations as ‘relatively flat’ – despite rising cases.

Mr Hopson said NHS Trust leaders were reporting ‘three consistent features’ regarding hospital admissions, tweeting: ‘First. Number of hospital Covid-19 admissions are consistently a lot lower than in previous waves. Second. Patients admitted are, on average, younger with less requirement for critical care, more treatment in general and acute beds, lower acuity and lower mortality rates.

‘Third. Very low numbers of Covid-19 admissions where patients have had two vaccinations and protection build-up post second jab.’

He said most people hospitalised after having two jabs have ‘pronounced co-morbidities’ – or other significant conditions.

Hospital leaders reported that community infection and Covid inpatient numbers were declining in hotspots, he said.

He cited ‘increasing confidence’ that vaccines had ‘broken the chain between Covid-19 infection and high levels of hospitalisations and then mortality in previous waves’, adding that it ‘feels very significant’.

Mr Hopson, whose organisation represents English NHS Trusts, said the NHS still faced enormous pressure and there were ‘significant risks’ to consider when deciding whether to lift restrictions on June 21. But he added: ‘Some have wrongly interpreted us highlighting these pressures as meaning we don’t want to ease lockdown on June 21 or want delay. This is untrue. We have not called for a delay – just for a better quality debate.’

The Indian variant makes up most of all UK cases. Early analysis by Public Health England suggested those who caught the strain – also known as the Delta variant – were twice as likely to need hospital treatment.

Around two-thirds of people attending A&E with the variant go home the same day

Around two-thirds of people attending A&E with the variant go home the same day

The Indian variant makes up most of all UK cases. Early analysis by Public Health England suggested those who caught the strain – also known as the Delta variant – were twice as likely to need hospital treatment

The Indian variant makes up most of all UK cases. Early analysis by Public Health England suggested those who caught the strain – also known as the Delta variant – were twice as likely to need hospital treatment

But it emerged last week that most patients with it don’t need to spend a single night in hospital. Official data shows Britons who received two vaccines make up less than 5 per cent of those hospitalised with the strain.

Around two-thirds of people attending A&E with the variant go home the same day.

The latest figures for inpatients are from Thursday, when 932 with Covid were in hospital. In January, it was nearly 40,000.

Speaking on Sky News’s Trevor Phillips On Sunday programme yesterday, Mr Hancock said: ‘We have said we will give people enough time ahead of the June 21 date… and the critical thing is to see whether the four tests we have set have been met.

‘That’s in terms of the number of cases, and cases are rising slightly, the number of hospitalisations, which are much more flat. That’s because the third test, the rollout of the vaccine, is going incredibly well.’

Sir Jeremy Farrar, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies and director of the Wellcome Trust medical charity, said he was ‘cautiously optimistic’ and the vaccine rollout had ‘saved countless lives’.



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