Harris holds first meeting in-person with Guatemalan President as protesters tell her to ‘go home’


Kamala Harris was greeted with protesters demanding she ‘mind her own business’ when she arrived in Guatemala for her first international trip as vice president.

‘Kamala go home,’ one white flag with black painted letters read.

As the vice president rode in her motorcade from Palacio Nacional de la Cultura, reporters spoted a group of pro-Trump demonstrators with sing reading: ‘Kamala, Trump won’ and ‘Kamala, mind your own business!’

Harris began her meeting with Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei with quick remarks where she said: ‘I very much have been looking forward to this trip, we have had many conversations, but it is good to see you in person.’

The two have spoken on the phone previously.

‘I am very proud that this is my first foreign trip as vice president,’ Harris continued. ‘It is a reflection of the priority that President Biden placed on this region.’

As Harris commenced her two-day trip south of the border, family continues to stream over into the U.S. either by foot or on inflatable rafts.

Vice President Kamala Harris' visit to Guatemala was met with protesters demanding she 'mind your own business'

Vice President Kamala Harris’ visit to Guatemala was met with protesters demanding she ‘mind your own business’

'Kamala go home' one sign read outside the Guatemalan Air Force facility

‘Kamala go home’ one sign read outside the Guatemalan Air Force facility

Vice President Kmala Harris

Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei

Harris arrived in Guatemala City on Sunday and held a bilateral meeting with President Alejandro Giammattei

Harris' first foreign trip comes as migrants continue to risk their lives making the trek from Central America to the U.S. southern border. Here people ride rafts across the Suchiate River between Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico and Tecun Uman, Guatemala on June 7, 2021

Harris’ first foreign trip comes as migrants continue to risk their lives making the trek from Central America to the U.S. southern border. Here people ride rafts across the Suchiate River between Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico and Tecun Uman, Guatemala on June 7, 2021

A 33-year-old Guatemalan man transports people and goods across the Suchiate RiverbetGuatemala and crosses over to Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, Monday, June 7, 2021. U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris faces a major test of her diplomatic skills Monday when she meets with Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei as part of her efforts to address the root causes of migration to the U.S. from the region. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

A 33-year-old Guatemalan man transports people and goods across the Suchiate River between Tecun Uman, Guatemala and Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico

Harris’ trip started off bumpy on Sunday when Air Force 2 was forced to turn around minutes after take-off due to ‘technical issues’, which appeared to stem from an unusual noise coming from the landing gear.

‘I’m good, I’m good. We all said a little prayer, but we’re good,’ Harris told reporters as she deplaned Air Force 2 and waited for another plane to get ready.

The vice president’s team has made it clear that Harris’ role as ‘border czar’ is to address the ‘root causes’ that lead to a mass amount of Central American citizens fleeing their home countries and migrating to the U.S. 

Harris chief spokesperson Symone Sanders told reporters climate and economic downfall were among ‘main drivers’ of the surge in migrants.

Critics claim, however, that President Joe Biden is to blame for the crisis after he immediately rolled back Trump-era border restrictions upon taking office this year.

The Biden administration has denied that they are sending the message that the border is ‘open’, and instead is blaming it on ‘root causes’ in Northern Triangle nations like climate, poverty, crime and corruption.

More than 178,000 migrants crossed the border in April alone, which was a continuation of a spike in February and March. Numbers for May have not yet been released.  

The bilateral meeting between Harris, Giammattei and their team was held Palacio Nacional de la Cultura

The bilateral meeting between Harris, Giammattei and their team was held Palacio Nacional de la Cultura

Harris listens as Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei speaks at their bilateral meeting

Harris listens as Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei speaks at their bilateral meeting 

Demonstrators urged Harris to 'respect Guatemala's constitution'

Demonstrators urged Harris to ‘respect Guatemala’s constitution’

Customs and Border Patrol number show record numbers of encounters with illegal crossers with a record-high of 178,622 in April alone, continuing on from massive spike in February and March

Customs and Border Patrol number show record numbers of encounters with illegal crossers with a record-high of 178,622 in April alone, continuing on from massive spike in February and March

The Supreme Court sided with President Joe Biden by unanimously refused on Monday to let immigrants who have been allowed to stay in the U.S. on humanitarian grounds apply to become permanent residents if they entered the country illegally.

The justices, acting on an appeal by a married couple from El Salvador who were granted so-called Temporary Protected Status, upheld a lower court ruling that barred their applications for permanent residency, also known as a green card, because of their unlawful entry.

The case could affect 400,000 immigrants, many of whom have lived in the U.S. for years. 

Biden, who has sought to reverse many of his Republican predecessor Donald Trump’s hardline immigration policies, had opposed the immigrants in this case, placing the president at odds with immigration advocacy groups and some of his fellow Democrats.

The Biden administration is facing a massive crisis at the southern border, which includes record-high levels of illegal crossers and all-time high numbers of unaccompanied minors in U.S. custody.

In March, Biden put Harris in charge of the migration crisis – but the administration has still not referred to the situation as such.

As it appeared the problem wasn’t going anywhere at the southern border, the administration quickly rebranded to indicate Harris is focused on addressing root causes that lead to mass migration to the U.S. from Northern Triangle countries – Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

Reports show the vice president’s office didn’t want to give her something that could be seen as a failure on her part.

Since taking over, Republicans have slammed the vice president for not once visiting the southern border, where enforcement groups are overwhelmed and facilities reached near 2,000 per cent capacity at some points.

A man polishes shoes of police officers standing guard on the street during Harris' visit to Guatemala City on June 7, 2021

A man polishes shoes of police officers standing guard on the street during Harris’ visit to Guatemala City on June 7, 2021

People wait in line at a checkpoint around the perimeter of the Palacio Nacional de la Cultura as Harris holds her bilateral meeting with Giammattei

People wait in line at a checkpoint around the perimeter of the Palacio Nacional de la Cultura as Harris holds her bilateral meeting with Giammattei

Harris said she will go to Mexico during her trip south of the border, but maintained that she will still not stop at the U.S. side of the border.

She has also already spoken on the phone with Guatemalan President Giammattei and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

Harris is meeting with Giammattei on Monday and will afterwards engage in events with Guatemalan community leaders and entrepreneurs afterwards.

On Tuesday, she will travel to Mexico City to meet with President López Obrador and participate in roundtables with women entrepreneurs and labor leaders in Mexico.

Supreme Court unanimously BLOCKS 400,000 immigrants who entered the US illegally and were allowed to stay on ‘humanitarian grounds’ from applying for a green card

The Supreme Court on Monday unanimously refused to let immigrants who have been allowed to stay in the United States on humanitarian grounds apply to become permanent residents if they entered the country illegally, siding with President Joe Biden’s administration.

The justices, acting in an appeal by a married couple from El Salvador who were granted so-called Temporary Protected Status, upheld a lower court ruling that barred their applications for permanent residency, also known as a green card, because of their unlawful entry.

The case could affect 400,000 immigrants, many of whom have lived in the United States for years.

The Supreme Court on Monday unanimously refused to let immigrants who have been allowed to stay in the United States on humanitarian grounds apply to become permanent residents if they entered the country illegally. The case involves Jose Sanchez and Sonia Gonzalez from El Salvador (above), who entered the US twice illegally

The Supreme Court on Monday unanimously refused to let immigrants who have been allowed to stay in the United States on humanitarian grounds apply to become permanent residents if they entered the country illegally. The case involves Jose Sanchez and Sonia Gonzalez from El Salvador (above), who entered the US twice illegally 

Biden, who has sought to reverse many of his Republican predecessor Donald Trump’s hardline immigration policies, had opposed the immigrants in this case, placing the president at odds with immigration advocacy groups and some of his fellow Democrats.

A federal law called the Immigration and Nationality Act generally requires that people seeking to become permanent residents have been ‘inspected and admitted’ into the United States. At issue in the case was whether a grant of Temporary Protected Status (TPS), which gives the recipient ‘lawful status,’ satisfies those requirements.

Writing for the court, liberal Justice Elena Kagan said that ‘because a grant of TPS does not come with a ticket of admission, it does not eliminate the disqualifying effect of an unlawful entry.’

Foreign nationals can be granted Temporary Protected Status if a humanitarian crisis in their home country, such as a natural disaster or armed conflict, would make their return unsafe. 

There are about 400,000 people in the United States with protected status, which prevents deportation and lets them work legally.

The case involves Jose Sanchez and Sonia Gonzalez, who live in New Jersey and have four children.

The couple twice entered the United States illegally: in 1997 and 1998. After a series of earthquakes in 2001, the United States designated El Salvador as covered under the Temporary Protected Status program. The couple received protection under the program that same year. 

Biden, who has sought to reverse many of his Republican predecessor Donald Trump's hardline immigration policies, had opposed the immigrants in this case, placing the president at odds with immigration advocacy groups and some of his fellow Democrats

Biden, who has sought to reverse many of his Republican predecessor Donald Trump’s hardline immigration policies, had opposed the immigrants in this case, placing the president at odds with immigration advocacy groups and some of his fellow Democrats

U.S. officials rejected their 2014 applications for green cards because they had not been lawfully admitted. 

They sued in federal court, saying that those with lawful status, including Temporary Protected Status recipients, are deemed to have been lawfully admitted, and may apply for permanent residency. 

Last year, the Philadelphia-based 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against the couple.

Besides El Salvador, 11 other countries currently have such designations: Haiti, Honduras, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Syria, Venezuela and Yemen. Myanmar was the latest addition to the list, placed there by Biden’s administration in the wake of a Feb. 1 military coup there.

The Supreme Court ruled in the case on a day when U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris visits Guatemala as part of the Biden administration’s efforts to lower migration to the United States from that country as well as El Salvador and Honduras.

Conservative justice Clarence Thomas initially suggested the Supreme Court would be reluctant to let immigrants with protected status apply for permanent residency when the case was first presented to the court on April 19. 

‘They clearly were not admitted at the borders, so is that a fiction, is it metaphysical, what is it? I don’t know,’ conservative Justice Clarence Thomas asked.



Source link

Spread the love

Written by bourbiza

WWDC 2021: Here’s what to watch for

Unique Father’s Day gifts | CNN Underscored