Bosses more keen than staff to return to the office, says ONS study 


Bosses are more keen than staff to return to the office: More than a third of workers plan to keep WFH for most of the week compared to less than a quarter of managers, says study

  • Figures from ONS have showed that businesses are keen to have workers back
  • Study shows 24% of bosses back permanent move to work from home in future 
  • Meanwhile 36% of employees want to work from home for most of their week
  • Plans to get workers back in offices are still shrouded in uncertainty after Prime Minister Boris Johnson pushed back final easing of restrictions by four weeks 










The UK’s bosses are more keen than their staff to return to the office with more than a third of workers planning to keep working from home for most of the week, a study has revealed.

Data from the Office of National Statistics shows that as little as 24 per cent of businesses said they intended to use increased homeworking going forward.

In contrast, 36 per cent of employees who are currently working from home indicated they wanted to keep the arrangement for most of the week.

The UK's bosses are more keen than their staff to return to the office with more than a third of workers planning to keep working from home for most of the week, a study has revealed

The UK’s bosses are more keen than their staff to return to the office with more than a third of workers planning to keep working from home for most of the week, a study has revealed

Graph shows the proportion of working adults reporting working from home exclusively has varied over the past year with grey boxes representing the Autumn and January lockdowns

Graph shows the proportion of working adults reporting working from home exclusively has varied over the past year with grey boxes representing the Autumn and January lockdowns

The study carried out by Government statisticians shows there is still a great amount of uncertainty among businesses over how they will continue to operate moving forward.

Of the thousands of businesses interviewed by the ONS in the past two months, 32 per cent said they are unsure when and how much of their workforce will return to the office.

Any plans to bring workers back to the office were cast in doubt yesterday after Prime Minister Boris Johnson pushed back the final easing of restrictions by four weeks.

Freedom Day which was planned to arrive on June 21 has now been delayed until July 19 over fears surrounding the Covid-19 Delta variant.

As a result, the Government’s guidance that employees should work from home where possible will remain in place for another month. 

Throughout the pandemic, the total number of employees working from home has risen from 27 per cent in 2019 to 37 per cent.

Barriers to collaboration was cited as the biggest drawback for working remotely from home

Barriers to collaboration was cited as the biggest drawback for working remotely from home

The research also shows that in the last year, online job adverts including terms related to ‘homeworking’ have increased at a faster rate than total adverts, with homeworking adverts in May 2021 three times above their February 2020 average. 

But, while Government advice through lockdowns was to work from home where possible, the study shows most people continued to travel to work.

However, the data shows that workers in London and the south east, in sectors including IT and Communications, and those with higher salaries had a larger proportion of home-workers during the last year.

The research showed that a better work/life balance was given as the main benefit of working from home while barriers to collaboration was cited as the biggest drawback.



Source link

Spread the love

Written by bourbiza

Leicester City eye cut-price deal for Barcelona star

Which MMA fighter got knocked out while dancing?