Disabled boy, 9, dies after being locked in hot car with windows closed for two hours by caregiver


Disabled boy, 9, dies after being locked in hot car with the windows rolled up for two hours by his caregiver

  • Police are investigating the death of a disabled boy whose caregiver left him in a hot car for two hours with the windows rolled up
  • Authorities state the caregiver, who was not immediately identified, might face criminal charges
  • The caretaker in question left him at Roost Services in American Fork, Utah – a local care providing facility for those with disabilities
  • Wednesday’s tragic fatal incident is the first hot-car related death in the state of Utah since 2019, but the 10th to happen in the US this year 
  • However, the adults involved did not face criminal charges in the two most recent cases to occur in Utah 
  • ‘The biggest mistake you can ever make is to think it can’t happen to you or your family,’ said Janette Fennell, founder of Kids and Car Safety










Police are investigating the death of a disabled boy whose caregiver may face criminal charges after leaving him in a hot car for two hours with the windows rolled up.

The caregiver, who was not immediately identified, left the 9-year-old boy Wednesday inside a car parked at Roost Services in American Fork, Utah – a care facility for those with disabilities. The caregiver is a Roost staff worker.

American Fork police Lt. Jason Christensen told KFOX 14 that the boy, whose name also was not publicly released, was brought to the facility by the employee around 11:30am.

His lifeless body was discovered just before 1:30pm, according to authorities.

‘Temperatures at that time here outside temperatures were in the high 90s, 97, 98, and so you can imagine the temperatures in the vehicle are going to be well, well above 100,’ Christensen said. 

‘It sounds as if he was picked up and brought here by a staff member. Somehow there was multiple individuals who were brought here by that staff member.’

Meanwhile, authorities are continuing to investigate whether or not the caregiver involved in the boy’s death will face criminal charges.  

Police are investigating the death of a disabled boy whose caregiver left him in a hot car (pictured) for two hours with the windows rolled up

Police are investigating the death of a disabled boy whose caregiver left him in a hot car (pictured) for two hours with the windows rolled up

Pictured: the inside of the vehicle where a disabled 9-year-old boy's body was discovered after he was left there for two hours in the parking lot of a Utah care facility

Pictured: the inside of the vehicle where a disabled 9-year-old boy’s body was discovered after he was left there for two hours in the parking lot of a Utah care facility

‘That’s part of what we’re trying to figure out is how and why he was still in the vehicle, we’re not completely certain on that,’ Christensen told KUTV. 

‘The vehicle was turned off, all the windows were rolled up and all the doors were closed.’ 

Christensen added that Roost Services has remained cooperative with investigators. ‘Everybody involved is taking this very hard, anytime it involves a child, they are very difficult things,’ he said. 

Wednesday’s tragedy is the first hot-car related death in the state of Utah since 2019, but the 10th in the US this year, according to Kids and Car Safety, which tracks hot-car deaths nationwide. 

A caregiver at Roost Services in American Fork, Utah (pictured) could face potential criminal charges for negligently leaving the disabled boy to die inside the hot car, police say

A caregiver at Roost Services in American Fork, Utah (pictured) could face potential criminal charges for negligently leaving the disabled boy to die inside the hot car, police say

'Temperatures were in the high 90s.. and so you can imagine the temperatures in the vehicle are going to be well above 100,' Christensen said (pictured)

‘Temperatures were in the high 90s.. and so you can imagine the temperatures in the vehicle are going to be well above 100,’ Christensen said (pictured)

PICTURED: In 2019, police submitted charges to the prosecutor for the similar death of Wade Taylor in Utah, but the county attorney declined to prosecute the case

PICTURED: In 2019, police submitted charges to the prosecutor for the similar death of Wade Taylor in Utah, but the county attorney declined to prosecute the case

However, adults involved did not face criminal charges in the two most recent cases in Utah. 

In 2017, charges were not filed after a 2-year-old died in a hot car at a family gathering in St. George. 

Two years later in 2019, police submitted charges to Santaquin prosecutors for the similar death of infant Wade Taylor, however the county’s district attorney ultimately declined to prosecute the case. 

According to Founder of Kids and Car Safety, Janette Fennell, the potential for hot-car related deaths is often overlooked until tragedy strikes.

‘The biggest mistake you can ever make is to think it can’t happen to you or your family,’ said Fennell.

‘I can guarantee you, people, this has happened. To never [think] it could happen to their family until it does.’

Advertisement



Source link

Spread the love

Written by bourbiza

Tommy Dorfmam, ’13 Reasons Why’ star, is celebrating her identity as a trans woman

Italy to Require Proof of Vaccination or Negative Test for Social Activities