Covid-19 Australia: Sydney braces for infection spike


Sydney braces for RECORD Covid cases as Health Minister confirms infection spike and demands people in city’s south-west ‘stop moving around’

  • New South Wales set to record highest daily spike in Covid-19 cases on Friday
  • Harsher restrictions are also likely to be enforced across south-west Sydney
  • Lockdown rules could also be eased in areas less impacted by the outbreak 










New South Wales is bracing for its highest daily spike in Covid-19 cases with harsher restrictions on the way.   

NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard has warned the cases will most likely surpass the 124 recorded on Thursday.  

‘There will be more (cases),’ Mr Hazzard said on The Kyle and Jackie O Show on Friday.  

The NSW Government is also reportedly in talks about tightening restrictions in Fairfield, Liverpool and Canterbury-Bankstown local government areas – where the majority of infections have been recorded. 

‘We need people in south-west Sydney to stop moving around,’ Mr Hazzard said. ‘We need people to understand it’s a dangerous virus.’ 

New South Wales is bracing for its highest daily spike in Covid-19 cases with harsher restrictions on the way (pictured, police speak to anti-lockdown protestors in Bankstown)

New South Wales is bracing for its highest daily spike in Covid-19 cases with harsher restrictions on the way (pictured, police speak to anti-lockdown protestors in Bankstown)

The NSW Government is also reportedly in talks about tightening restrictions in Fairfield, Liverpool and Canterbury-Bankstown local government areas - where the majority of infections have been recorded

The NSW Government is also reportedly in talks about tightening restrictions in Fairfield, Liverpool and Canterbury-Bankstown local government areas – where the majority of infections have been recorded 

Sources say more police patrols or the further tightening of travel rules could be on the table. 

Premier Gladys Berejiklian said on Thursday that the number of new infections over the weekend will determine how restrictions in the city and surrounding regions will change after July 30, when they’re currently set to end.

Discussions about how restrictions may be changed to further lock down the south-west and ease pressure on areas with few cases will begin next week, The Australian reported.

Areas pegged for eased restrictions in the overhaul include the Northern Beaches, Shellharbour and the Central Coast, which have both seen too few case numbers to warrant stay-home orders.

Shellharbour especially has not had a single case since June, but residents still face the same stay-home orders as those living in the heart of Sydney.

Kiama MP Gareth Ward urged Mr Hazzard on Thursday to rethink restrictions for the south coast.

‘It is totally unreasonable to keep the people of the Shellharbour LGA in lockdown. If circumstances change, restrictions could be reconsidered,’ Mr Ward wrote.  

Sources say more police patrols or the further tightening of travel rules could be on the table (pictured, two women walking down Haldon Street in Lakemba, in Sydney's south-west)

Sources say more police patrols or the further tightening of travel rules could be on the table (pictured, two women walking down Haldon Street in Lakemba, in Sydney’s south-west)

Areas pegged for eased restrictions in the overhaul include the Northern Beaches, Shellharbour and the Central Coast, which have both seen too few case numbers to warrant stay-home orders (pictured, women in Bondi on the Eastern Beaches enjoy a sunny Thursday walk)

Areas pegged for eased restrictions in the overhaul include the Northern Beaches, Shellharbour and the Central Coast, which have both seen too few case numbers to warrant stay-home orders (pictured, women in Bondi on the Eastern Beaches enjoy a sunny Thursday walk)

But health officials are said to be deeply concerned that the daily infection rates aren’t going down in the south-west of the city, and that the number of infected people out in the community is steadily on the rise.

As it stands, five million residents of Greater Sydney are not allowed to leave their homes except to shop for groceries, go to work, meet up with one other person outside, see the GP or care for someone.

Residents have already endured almost four weeks of what was supposed to be a one week lockdown, but the city has continued to record high case numbers every day.  

Despite rules dictating outdoor exercise can be done with one other person, far larger crowds have been seen hanging out in Sydney’s east – where the outbreak first began on June 16 with an infected airport driver from Bondi. 

Eastern suburbs locals walking with coffees and chatting with friends (pictured on Thursday), while the city's south-western suburbs face harsher restrictions

Eastern suburbs locals walking with coffees and chatting with friends (pictured on Thursday), while the city’s south-western suburbs face harsher restrictions

While those in the city’s eastern suburbs were seen out enjoying the beach on a sun-drenched Thursday, the situation in the south-west is dire. 

Residents of Fairfield, Canterbury-Bankstown and Liverpool are already banned from leaving their LGAs entirely unless they are authorised workers.

Even then, they have to present a negative Covid test every three days, which has seen hour-long queues at testing centres.  

The south-west has already been subject to tougher restrictions than the rest of the city due to a disproportionate number of cases recorded in those areas. 

More to come 

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Written by bourbiza

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