SA dad who shot his son dead before turning on teenager’s girlfriend to appeal life sentence


Pawel Klosowski, 46, (pictured) will appeal the life sentence he was handed for killing his son and the teenager's girlfriend

Pawel Klosowski, 46, (pictured) will appeal the life sentence he was handed for killing his son and the teenager’s girlfriend

A father who shot his own son before turning the gun on the teenager’s beloved girlfriend will have the opportunity to argue for an earlier release from prison. 

Pawel Klosowski was handed a 34-year sentence after he pleaded guilty to the murder of Lukasz Klosowski and Chelsea Ireland, both 19, on his property at Mount McIntyre, south-east South Australia, in August last year.

The 46-year-old faced the Supreme Court in April this year and was ordered to serve 34 years without parole by Justice Anne Bampton.  

He will be 80 years old by the time he is eligible for parole. 

In documents viewed by The Advertiser and filed by Klosowski’s lawyer Nick Vadasz, it was revealed the killer will argue the non-parole period is ‘manifestly excessive’. 

Klosowki will also dispute the starting point in all circumstances was too high and the reduction of 15 per cent for a guilty plea was too low. 

Pictured: Lukasz Klosowski and Chelsea Ireland, both 19, before they were shot dead at a family home

Pictured: Lukasz Klosowski and Chelsea Ireland, both 19, before they were shot dead at a family home

Commissioner for Victims’ Rights Bronwyn Killmier said the decision to contest the double murder charge came as a slap in the face to the victims’ families. 

‘It will just exacerbate their trauma that they would already feel,’ Ms Killmier said, adding Klosowski should take responsibility by accepting the sentence.

In previous submissions, Klosowski admitted he could not explain his actions amid an alcohol-fuelled argument over the dinner table, during which time he drank a carton of beer and reduced his teenage son to tears.

In a medical report at the time of his sentencing neuropsychologist Dr Emma Fitzgerald said the convicted killer had a history of angry outbursts. 

Dr Fitzgerald also said the 46-year-old had trouble recalling what happened during the fiery flare-ups. 

Before she was gunned down in a double murder at a rural farm in southeast South Australia, Chelsea Ireland lived her life putting others before herself

Before she was gunned down in a double murder at a rural farm in southeast South Australia, Chelsea Ireland lived her life putting others before herself

‘It is respectfully submitted that the reduction, taking into account the timing and circumstances together with the genuine remorse and in all the circumstances, going to mitigation, was manifestly inadequate,’ the defendant wrote. 

‘Further, the cumulative effect of a too high starting point and a too low reduction has caused the sentencing process to miscarry and has resulted in a manifestly excessive non-parole period.’ 

A medical report stated Pawel Klosowski (pictured) had a history of angry outbursts

A medical report stated Pawel Klosowski (pictured) had a history of angry outbursts

The Department of Public Prosecutions has countered the submission and said neither aspect of their argument was plausible. 

‘A non parole period of 34 years imprisonment (reduced from 40 years) and a generous discount of 15 per cent appropriately reflects the nature of the applicant’s offending,’ they wrote. 

The department said Klososki’s offending ‘rightly calls for strong community condemnation’ adding the brutal slaying of the young couple continues to have a profound impact on their family and friends.  

The court previously heard that Ms Ireland did not want to go to the family barbecue at Klosowski’s home on the ill-fated evening, but went to support her boyfriend.

She messaged friends at one stage to say the evening had ‘gone to s**t and that her boyfriend had been crying, according to news.com.au.

Klosowski’s wife Magda Pearce told the teenage girl that her husband was ‘pi**ed as f**k’, which was a weekly occurrence.

Pictured: Magda Pearce, mother of Lukasz Klosowski, leaves the Adelaide Supreme Court in Adelaide on April 1

Pictured: Magda Pearce, mother of Lukasz Klosowski, leaves the Adelaide Supreme Court in Adelaide on April 1

Pictured: Friends of the victims arrive at the Adelaide Supreme Court in Adelaide on April 1

Pictured: Friends of the victims arrive at the Adelaide Supreme Court in Adelaide on April 1

After the father and son got into an argument, Klosowski asked for his gun.

Lukasz was shot first in a bedroom, before Klosowski reloaded his gun and fired at the locked bathroom door where Ms Ireland had hidden and called triple zero.

A second shot, delivered at close range, killed her with her body found in the bath. 

In a short apology read to the court, Klosowski said he thought about what he had done every day. 

‘I acted like a monster. The world would be a better place if I had shot myself instead,’ he said.

‘They were two wonderful people who were clearly destined to live happy … I destroyed the lives of their family and many other people.’

But prosecutor Kos Lesses said the apology was ‘too little, too late’.

Mr Lesses said the shootings followed a row between Klosowski and his son after the teenager had indicated his intention to move out of his mother’s house.

Pictured: Chelsea Ireland's sister Maddie (left) and Lukasz Klosowski's mother Magda Pearce outside the Adelaide Supreme Court in Adelaide on April 1

Pictured: Chelsea Ireland’s sister Maddie (left) and Lukasz Klosowski’s mother Magda Pearce outside the Adelaide Supreme Court in Adelaide on April 1

Pictured: Lukasz was farewelled at an intimate funeral as flowers and a photograph of him was laid on his coffin

Pictured: Lukasz was farewelled at an intimate funeral as flowers and a photograph of him was laid on his coffin

The Ireland family previously described Chelsea and Lukasz (pictured) as great mates who had 'just bonded'

The Ireland family previously described Chelsea and Lukasz (pictured) as great mates who had ‘just bonded’

‘The offending came about due to the insulting of the defendant’s pride,’ the prosecutor said. 

‘And it was fuelled by the combination of two fatal causes, anger and alcohol.’

Justice Brampton detailed how the argument had escalated with the killer berating his son at one stage for crying like a ‘little baby’.

She said affronted by perceived disrespect from his son and Ms Ireland, Klosowski’s behaviour escalated becoming irrational, reactive and ultimately violent. 

‘Your conduct was deliberate and purposeful,’ she told him.  

Pictured: Lukasz Klosowski, Maddie Ireland and Chelsea Ireland. Maddie posted the image on Facebook with the caption 'my guardian angels'

Pictured: Lukasz Klosowski, Maddie Ireland and Chelsea Ireland. Maddie posted the image on Facebook with the caption ‘my guardian angels’

Because of his early guilty pleas, Klosowski was entitled to up to a 40 per cent discount on his non-parole period but Mr Lesses asked for any reduction to be significantly curtailed. 

In September, Ms Ireland’s family revealed she was passionate about the environment and determined to ‘change the world’ after learning of her death.  

They remembered the mechanical engineering student as someone who left a lasting impression on everyone she met.

‘Chelsea was compassionate, strong, selfless and fearless and continues to make us proud every day,’ her father Greg Ireland said.

Greg and Debra Ireland, who treated Lukasz like a member of the family, recalled the final moment they shared with their daughter - the morning before the tragedy

Greg and Debra Ireland, who treated Lukasz like a member of the family, recalled the final moment they shared with their daughter – the morning before the tragedy

Pictured front, left to right: Chelsea Ireland's sister Maddie, Lukasz Klosowski's mother Magda Pearce and her partner, Chelsea Ireland's father Greg and mother Debra

Pictured front, left to right: Chelsea Ireland’s sister Maddie, Lukasz Klosowski’s mother Magda Pearce and her partner, Chelsea Ireland’s father Greg and mother Debra

‘We haven’t just lost a daughter, we’ve lost a best friend. Our hearts will forever remain broken.’

The family said Chelsea and Lukasz were great mates and had ‘just bonded’.

Her devastated parents previously recalled the final moment they shared with their daughter – the morning before the tragedy. 

‘I went in and kissed her goodbye and said…”be careful on that road” and she said ”what do you think Lukasz is going to do? He’s not stupid”,’ Mrs Ireland previously told The Advertiser.

Mr Ireland also gave his daughter a hug and said he loved her.   

When she was just 15 years old, Chelsea watched a YouTube video that inspired her to donate her waist-length brown locks to cancer patients

When she was just 15 years old, Chelsea watched a YouTube video that inspired her to donate her waist-length brown locks to cancer patients

Mrs Ireland said her daughter had only met the accused killer four times – twice when he took the couple for dinner in Adelaide, and twice in Mount Gambier, near his property.

‘I just keep wishing I could have said to her don’t go but she was 19, she had travelled Europe on her own. She was street-smart, independent, strong-willed – there was no way I could have held her home, but I just wish I could have,’ the mother-of-two said.

Kłosowski had barely seen his son since his relationship with Lukasz’s mother Magdalena broke down in 2005.

Family friends said Magdalena limited contact between her ex-husband and her son, and later started dating a woman she is still in a relationship with.

Lukasz was studying journalism at the University of South Australia while working at KFC

Lukasz was studying journalism at the University of South Australia while working at KFC

Chelsea and Lukasz dated for several years and had travelled the world together, exploring his Polish heritage

Chelsea and Lukasz dated for several years and had travelled the world together, exploring his Polish heritage

Kłosowski and Lukasz only occasionally crossed paths until recent years when he tried to mend fences after marrying his wife Monica.

However, Kłosowski noted his son’s absence from numerous family photos with his three stepchildren and called him ‘stubborn’.  

The Ireland family told the publication they never thought ‘tragedies you see in the paper’ would happen to them.  

Chelsea and Lukasz dated for several years and had travelled the world together, exploring his Polish heritage. 

They attended different Adelaide high schools – Lukasz at Christian Brothers College and Chelsea at St Mary’s College.

The house on the expansive property off Mount McIntyre Road in Mount McIntyre where Kłosowski and his wife live and the shooting took place

The house on the expansive property off Mount McIntyre Road in Mount McIntyre where Kłosowski and his wife live and the shooting took place

Lukasz was studying journalism at the University of South Australia while working at KFC.

His girlfriend was enrolled in mechanical engineering at Adelaide University and working at Baker’s Delight. 

Defence counsel Nick Vadasz told the court that while Klosowski could not explain his actions on the night he accepted that his intention was to kill. 

‘The prisoner accepts the horror of his behaviour,’ Mr Vadasz said. 

Klosowski will front the Court of Appeal via videolink on Tuesday August 10. 



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Written by Bourbiza Mohamed

A technology enthusiast and a passionate writer in the field of information technology, cyber security, and blockchain

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