Trump campaign memo knocked down bizarre theory involving Dominion voting machines


Trump campaign memo knocked down bizarre theory involving Dominion voting machines, Soros and Venezuela before infamous news conference where lawyers made wild claim, court documents show

  • The memo appears in court documents brought by a former Dominion employee 
  • Campaign asked aides to assess conspiracy theory involving Dominion, Smartmatic, Venezuela, and Geroge Soros
  • The response did not confirm such a conspiracy to rig election results
  • It came days before infamous press conference by Trump backers at RNC 










Members of former President Donald Trump’s presidential campaign compiled a research memo that knocked down claims of a conspiracy to manipulate votes involving Dominion Voting Systems Machines – even as pro-Trump lawyers were promoting the theory at an infamous post-election press conference, according to court documents.

According the the documents, which are cited in a defamation lawsuit being brought by a former Dominion employee, an official in the Trump campaigns’ communications shop asked aides to analyze the claims, which were being put forward in the weeks after the election.

Zack Parkinson, the Trump campaign’s former deputy communications director, tasked aides with running down information on the theories, which were being promoted by Trump backers in the media. 

A Trump campaign official asked aides to perform research on claims being made in the media about Dominion Voting Systems days before an infamous press conference by 'Kraken' lawyer Sidney Powell and longtime Trump advisor Rudy Giuliani

A Trump campaign official asked aides to perform research on claims being made in the media about Dominion Voting Systems days before an infamous press conference by ‘Kraken’ lawyer Sidney Powell and longtime Trump advisor Rudy Giuliani

Those supporters were alleging a massive scheme to rig votes in states or counties where Trump lost to Joe Biden. 

The memo his aides produced the following day debunked claims about Dominion and the Smartmatic software company, according to a report in the New York Times. 

The memos and emails surrounding them were introduced as evidence in the defamation case brought by former Dominion employee Eric Coomer, whose suit alleges that the Trump campaign knew the series of claims about the company. 

According to the paper, Parkinson asked aides to ‘substantiate or debunk’ the information in a Nov. 13th memo. Aides produced their response in about a day, and gathered mostly publicly available information about the claims.

A former Trump campaing source disputed the characterization that the campaign sought to tear down the claims. ‘We looked into it,’ the former source told DailyMail.com, saying a high-level Trump campaign official wanted to assess the potential validity of the claims being made by supporters in the media.

Former Dominion employee Eric Coomer is suing for defamation

Former Dominion employee Eric Coomer is suing for defamation

A former Trump campaing source disputed the characterization that the campaign sought to tear down the claims, saying: 'We looked into it'

A former Trump campaing source disputed the characterization that the campaign sought to tear down the claims, saying: ‘We looked into it’

Zach Parkinson

Zach Parkinson

The result was a document stating that Dominion did not use Smartmatic voting technology in the 2020 election, had no connection to the Venezuelan government or Soros, the Hungary-born billionaire, or to antifa.   

Days later, ‘Kraken’ lawyer Sidney Powell and longtime Trump advisor Rudy Giuliani appeared a their infamous press conference Nov. 19th at Republican National Committee headquarters where Powell sketched out her claim of massive election fraud involving a range of players, including ‘communist money’ behind it.

The memo’s apparent conclusion could prove useful to Coomer’s lawyers, who argue that it ‘shows that, at least internally, the Trump campaign found there was no evidence to support the conspiracy theories regarding Dominion’ that Trump-backers nevertheless put forward. 

The legal motion blames the Trump campaign for allowing the conspiracy theories to advance unchecked, ‘apparently without providing them with their own research debunking those theories.’ 

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Written by bourbiza

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