PM heads back from Spain break as poll shows Tory lead over Labour UP


Boris Johnson arrived back in the UK today after a poll found his lead over Keir Starmer has stretched to 10 points despite mounting chaos in supply chains and surging inflation.

The PM has spent the week on holiday in Spain with his wife Carrie and son Wilfred amid a fresh wave of grim warnings about shortages in the run-up to Christmas. 

Sources close to the premier said the family flew on commercial flights ‘with other ordinary passengers’ on both the outbound and return journeys.  

He was spotted landing at London’s Heathrow Airport on a British Airways plane before being driven away in a Range Rover flanked by four motorcycle outriders. 

The country has been wracked by alarm over soaring energy bills and the risk spiking inflation will force the Bank of England to hike interest rates sooner than planned.

But according to the latest YouGov poll the turbulence is not denting the Tories’ standing with voters.

The party’s support has gone up two points in a week, hitting 41 per cent in the research conducted yesterday and Tuesday. 

Meanwhile, Labour was stalled on 31 per cent, with Sir Keir facing increasing frustration in his own ranks about why they are not making inroads.

Mr Johnson also maintained his advantage as ‘best PM’, with 31 per cent opting for him and 25 per cent for Sir Keir. 

The PM was spotted landing at London's Heathrow Airport on a British Airways plane today

The PM was spotted landing at London’s Heathrow Airport on a British Airways plane today

He was then driven away in a Range Rover flanked by four motorcycle outriders

He was then driven away in a Range Rover flanked by four motorcycle outriders

The PM's convoy pictured after he landed at London's Heathrow Airport this evening

The PM’s convoy pictured after he landed at London’s Heathrow Airport this evening

The PM's convoy leaving the Spanish villa where he spent the week on holiday with his family

The PM’s convoy leaving the Spanish villa where he spent the week on holiday with his family

A poll today found the Tory lead over Labour has stretched to 10 points despite mounting chaos in supply chains and surging inflation

A poll today found the Tory lead over Labour has stretched to 10 points despite mounting chaos in supply chains and surging inflation

41% unable to buy key goods over past week 

Three-fifths of Britons say they have been unable to do routine shopping over the past week.

Some 41 per cent reported failing to secure normal products in a poll for MailOnline, underlining the supply chain chaos wracking the country.

Fuel was the most common problem, with 42 per cent saying they could not purchase any in the research by Redfield & Wilton Strategies. 

But 30 per cent said they were thwarted from buying meat, while the same proportion complained about a lack of fruit or vegetables.

A quarter could not get dairy products, with 40 per cent raising gripes about other household items – and 14 per cent insisting finding medicine had been difficult.     

As Mr Johnson’s convoy was seen leaving the Queues still visible at petrol stations in some parts of the country after a wave of panic buying caused chaos.

There have also been warnings about delays stacking up at ports, while surging worldwide demand after the pandemic and international shortages of lorry drivers have contributed to a ‘perfect storm’ for shoppers.

Rishi Sunak could only offer limited reassurance today there will be presents under the tree this Christmas, amid fears the supply chain crisis will leave shelves bare.

The Chancellor admitted the government ‘can’t fix every single problem’, but said ministers were doing ‘absolutely everything we can’ to solve issues at British ports and in shops ahead of the festive period.

Families have been urged to start shopping now amid fears supplies of toys, electrical goods and other products will be disrupted by logjams. 

One in three retailers in Britain are expecting prices to increase over the next three months amid pressures including spiking energy costs.

The British Retail Consortium said there are ‘clear signs’ that the combination of issues are ‘starting to filter through to consumer prices’, and small retailers across the UK say they are expecting to have to charge more.

But others said they are ‘desperately holding off from being a Christmas grinch and keeping everything the same’ because they don’t want to give shoppers more reasons not to buy in what is already a tough market.  

Mr Johnson has indulged n some painting during his retreat in Spain (pictured on Tuesday)

Mr Johnson has indulged n some painting during his retreat in Spain (pictured on Tuesday)

Empty shelves in Leeds are pictured today as stocks run low at a Sainsbury's supermarket due to supply issues

Empty shelves in Leeds are pictured today as stocks run low at a Sainsbury’s supermarket due to supply issues

In comical scenes, it has emerged that a Tesco Extra in Cardiff put a huge display of sunflower oil at the end of a frozen food aisle, while another placed salad cream and HP Sauce in chillers  – and a Gloucester Asda filled empty shelves with Lynx Africa deodorant.

Meanwhile a Tesco in Pontypridd, South Wales, put a wall of tomatoes in place of the usual salad items. And a Co-op store in Hertfordshire filled fruit and vegetable sections with Quality Street, Celebrations and Dairy Milk.

Insiders said it was not being driven by head offices and was just staff thinking on their feet. Barbara Davies, 71, told the Sun: ‘It feels like items have been plonked in odd places where other products would normally be. 

‘Why would they put so many bottles of sunflower oil right next to all the frozen food? It does make me worry about what Christmas might look like.’    

Some 41 per cent reported failing to secure normal products in a poll for MailOnline, underlining the supply chain chaos wracking the country

Some 41 per cent reported failing to secure normal products in a poll for MailOnline, underlining the supply chain chaos wracking the country

Fuel was the most common problem, with 42 per cent saying they could not purchase any in the research by Redfield & Wilton Strategies

Fuel was the most common problem, with 42 per cent saying they could not purchase any in the research by Redfield & Wilton Strategies



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