Teary traveller who can’t see his dying mother in WA sends emotional plea to Mark McGowan


A devastated overseas arrival who has been barred from visiting his dying mother in Western Australia has sent a brutal message to Mark McGowan. 

The man landed in Sydney’s Kingsford Smith Airport onboard one of 16 quarantine-free flights to hit Australian shores in nearly two years this morning. 

The WA Premier has ruled residents stranded in NSW can’t return home even for compassionate reasons due to the state’s classification as ‘high risk’.  

‘I am scared and emotional because I really want to see my mum,’ the teary traveller told reporters at the airport. 

‘Because the doctor has said she doesn’t have long and I’m going to do whatever I can today to see her.’ 

A devastated overseas arrival (pictured) who has been barred from visiting his dying mother in Western Australia has sent a brutal message to Mark McGowan

A devastated overseas arrival (pictured) who has been barred from visiting his dying mother in Western Australia has sent a brutal message to Mark McGowan

The man pleaded for assistance from the NSW Department of Health to help him find a way around the tough border measure and reunite with his sick mother. 

‘She’s been in permanent care for a few years and it’s been so long since I’ve seen her, I love her heaps and I just want to get back there,’ he said. 

The man addressed the WA Premier on live TV and begged for his compassion. 

‘Mark, think of the people suffering mentally to see their family, that’s also a health issue, I know we have to protect people’s lives but you have to bring families back together.

‘We respect you’re trying to be safe but everybody needs to be together, please.’ 

The teary traveller (pictured) said he would do whatever he could to return to Western Australia to visit his dying mother

The teary traveller (pictured) said he would do whatever he could to return to Western Australia to visit his dying mother

It comes as emotional reunions unfolded as the first of the overseas flights arrived at Kingsford Smith Airport before dawn on Monday.

Travellers emerged from the airport gates to run into the arms of their loved ones and embrace family members who had been eagerly waiting for them. 

It marks the first time in a gruelling 590 days that some families have been reunited after international borders were closed in March 2020.  

Under the change to international travel, fully vaccinated passengers won’t have to quarantine in a hotel or at home, paving the way for Australians stranded overseas to be able to come home for Christmas.

International travellers have embraced their loved ones for the first time in months after the first of the quarantine-free flights touched down at Sydney airport

International travellers have embraced their loved ones for the first time in months after the first of the quarantine-free flights touched down at Sydney airport

Emotional reunions unfolded as the first of the overseas flights arrived at Kingsford Smith Airport before dawn on Monday

Emotional reunions unfolded as the first of the overseas flights arrived at Kingsford Smith Airport before dawn on Monday

Travellers emerged from the airport gates to run into the arms of their loved ones and embrace family members who had been patiently waiting for them

Travellers emerged from the airport gates to run into the arms of their loved ones and embrace family members who had been patiently waiting for them

Families were reunited for the first time in nearly two years as emotional reunions unfolded outside the arrivals gate on Monday

Families were reunited for the first time in nearly two years as emotional reunions unfolded outside the arrivals gate on Monday

Sydney Airport staff carried platters of muffins and savory snacks, Qantas staff donned ‘welcome’ signs, and a band set up outside – potentially to play ‘I still call Australia home’.

Toni and Theo walked in holding a ‘welcome home balloon’ and blue teddy bear for their infant granddaughter Emilia, who they’d never met.

‘Our daughter is flying in from Spain with our granddaughter – we haven’t seen her since 2019,’ the 67-year-old said.

‘Her flights kept getting cancelled, but she was lucky because she would have had to go into quarantine.’

When their daughter Melissa walked through the gates, Toni broke down. 

As the returned travellers walked through the arrival gates to reunite with loved ones, outgoing passengers were saying goodbye to their families before walking through the departure gates as overseas travel resumed.

Prospective travellers hugged their loved ones goodbye at the taxi stand for the first time since the start of the pandemic.

Vivian, in her 50s, said a teary-eyed farewell to her best friend Heather before finally leaving for New York to see her partner and two sons.

The pair were ecstatic.

‘First of November, what a day!’ Heather said.

Vivian added: ‘Both my boys are in college so I had to get a travel exemption for three months and that came through and I made a lot of bookings – five or six, and then eventually landed on this one.’

Heather also explained her neighbour is finally coming home today after spending two years in Dubai.

Families wheel their luggage out the front entrance of the airport after finally being reunited on Monday

Families wheel their luggage out the front entrance of the airport after finally being reunited on Monday

Travellers arrive at Sydney's International Airport as early morning flights arrived from Los Angeles, Japan and Singapore

Travellers arrive at Sydney’s International Airport as early morning flights arrived from Los Angeles, Japan and Singapore

A returned traveller speaks to media waiting outside the airport as quarantine-free flights touched down in Sydney

A returned traveller speaks to media waiting outside the airport as quarantine-free flights touched down in Sydney

A returned traveller pushes his luggage through the terminal after the first of the quarantine-free flights touched down in Sydney on Monday

A returned traveller pushes his luggage through the terminal after the first of the quarantine-free flights touched down in Sydney on Monday

A woman waiting at the arrivals gate waves to her mother who was among the returned travellers on the first of the quarantine-free flights to land in Sydney on Monday

A woman waiting at the arrivals gate waves to her mother who was among the returned travellers on the first of the quarantine-free flights to land in Sydney on Monday

Ava, 27, hasn’t seen her boyfriend of six years in two years and is finally flying to Singapore today.

‘It was scary before because there was no news about when I could see him, and I don’t know when I’ll be able to see him again after this, but I am feeling excited.’

‘But so many other partners are still separated with no idea when they’ll be able to see their loved ones again.’

Alex, 31, was carrying a sun hat while waiting for her flight to New York, and eventually Mexico for her niece’s second birthday.

‘I’m excited,’ she said.

‘I know the lockdowns were necessary, but it’s been a long time since we’ve been able to see family members.’

Pakoe, 33, is excited to fly to Fiji with two friends to Fiji for three months to see his family.

‘I haven’t seen them in three years,’ he said.

Another woman and her husband are flying to New York to introduce her 1.5 year old son to her parents for the first time.

Jovial scenes were at the arrival section of Sydney airport early Monday morning. 

A returned traveller is reunited with their loved one after the first planes touched down at Sydney Airport on Monday

A returned traveller is reunited with their loved one after the first planes touched down at Sydney Airport on Monday

Alex, 31, was carrying a sun hat while waiting for her flight to New York, and eventually Mexico for her niece's second birthday

Alex, 31, was carrying a sun hat while waiting for her flight to New York, and eventually Mexico for her niece’s second birthday

Ava, 27, hasn't seen her boyfriend of six years in two years and is finally flying to Singapore today

Ava, 27, hasn’t seen her boyfriend of six years in two years and is finally flying to Singapore today

Vivian (left), in her 50s, said a teary-eyed farewell to her best friend Heather (right) before finally leaving for New York to see her partner and two sons

Vivian (left), in her 50s, said a teary-eyed farewell to her best friend Heather (right) before finally leaving for New York to see her partner and two sons

Meanwhile, fully jabbed people in NSW can from Monday start travelling freely between Greater Sydney and the regions.

The lifting of intrastate travel restrictions will allow families to reunite for the first time in months and marks the return of regional tourism.

‘For the first time in a long time, grandparents will be able to visit grandkids … many people will be reunited,’ Premier Dominic Perrottet said on Sunday.

He’s confident it’s a safe time to allow Sydneysiders back into the rest of the state, with double dose vaccination coverage now nearing 88 per cent.

The border opening is estimated to bring a $1billion a week surge in consumer spending. 

As of Saturday, 83.6 per cent of eligible NSW residents aged years and over 16 had received their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine and 87.7 per cent were fully vaccinated.

A returned traveller pushes his suitcases on a trolley after arriving in Sydney on Monday

A returned traveller pushes his suitcases on a trolley after arriving in Sydney on Monday

Monday will also see the state’s vaccine booster program open to adults who received their second jab six months ago or longer.

Pfizer doses will be available from pharmacies, GP clinics and state-run hubs across the state.

Nationally, rapid antigen tests also become available on Monday.

The changes come as NSW continues to see virus case numbers and hospitalisations fall, after lockdown rules began to be eased three weeks ago.

Some 177 people were diagnosed with COVID-19 statewide in the 24 hours to 8pm on Saturday, 59 fewer than the day before and the lowest daily tally in more than three months.

Now 340 people are in hospital with the virus, including 78 in intensive care.

One death was announced on Sunday – an unvaccinated woman in her 70s from southwestern Sydney.

International travellers have touched down at Sydney airport as the border to NSW re-opens in a landmark day for the state's COVID-19 response

International travellers have touched down at Sydney airport as the border to NSW re-opens in a landmark day for the state’s COVID-19 response

The first overseas flight touched down at Kingsford Smith Airport before dawn on Monday

The first overseas flight touched down at Kingsford Smith Airport before dawn on Monday

International travel

Australians who have spent the past year-and-a-half itching to go overseas will now be able to do so as long as they’ve received both jabs and are permanent residents or citizens.

Travellers will no longer need to apply for an exemption to leave the country but will need to show proof of their vaccination status.

Those under the age of 12 or who can’t be vaccinated due to medical reasons will also be allowed to travel.

Australians will also need to show proof of a negative PCR Covid test taken 72 hours before they leave the country.

Travellers under the age of five will not need to receive a Covid test.

Those living in Australia who aren’t citizens or don’t have permanent residency are still banned from returning Down Under if they were to leave.  

Under the change, fully vaccinated passengers won't have to quarantine in a hotel or at home, paving the way for Australians stranded overseas to be able to come home for Christmas

Under the change, fully vaccinated passengers won’t have to quarantine in a hotel or at home, paving the way for Australians stranded overseas to be able to come home for Christmas

Quarantine restrictions

For those who are double-vaxxed and returning to Australia, there is no longer a requirement to quarantine at home or in a hotel upon arrival in NSW, Victoria and the ACT. 

This means the gruelling fortnight confined to a hotel room will be a thing of the past, with travellers having had to fork out thousands of dollars to pay for their accommodation. 

But the new freedoms do not apply to other states and territories.

In Tasmania, fully-vaccinated travellers can arrive in the state without having to quarantine from December 15.

They will need to provide a negative Covid test 72 hours before arrival.

Tassie residents who have been out of the state for less than a week will not need to be tested.

Meanwhile Queensland’s borders are set to open on December 17, in line with the state hitting the 80 per cent double vaccination target.

South Australia will welcome back fully-vaccinated domestic travellers from November 23 without quarantine, and international travellers once 90 per cent are double vaxxed.

The Northern Territory will allow travellers from hot spots to home quarantine as of November 23. 

Western Australia, which has remained mostly shut off to the rest of the country during the pandemic, is yet to reveal its reopening plan – much to the disappointment of families shut off from their loved ones.  

Qantas has already taken bookings for nearly 500,000 domestic flights within the past fortnight (pictured, Qantas crew on October 28)

Qantas has already taken bookings for nearly 500,000 domestic flights within the past fortnight (pictured, Qantas crew on October 28)

MAJOR CHANGES TO COVID RULES FROM NOVEMBER 1

– Australian citizens, permanent residents and their immediate families can now fly into NSW, Victoria or the ACT without entering hotel quarantine as long as they are fully-vaccinated

– Double-jabbed Australians are also allowed to fly overseas without getting an exemption, and can go anywhere in the world 

– Sydneysiders can travel all over NSW 

– Borders are down between NSW, the ACT and Victoria 



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