Push for schoolkids as young as five to sing Australian national anthem every day before class


Schoolkids as young as five could be expected to sing the national anthem every morning before class

  • Kids as young as five could soon be expected to sing the national anthem daily 
  • Push from Queensland MPs to unite children of all race and religion in classroom 
  • Anthem has been a point of contention – particularly for Indigenous community
  • Prime Minister Scott Morrison changed one line of anthem to ease controversy 










Schoolchildren as young as five could soon be expected to sing the national anthem every day before starting class.

The policy was proposed at a state Liberal party council meeting in Gladstone, Queensland, on Saturday.

Fiona Simpson, MP for Maroochydore on the Sunshine Coast, said such a policy could help to foster strong ‘national identity’ in Australian youth.

Poll

Should schoolkids sing the national anthem before class every day?

She said it was crucial children embraced the importance of the anthem from a young age so they could understand its meaning by the time they became adults.

‘We must ensure our children understand how important it is as part of their national identity and then grow that as citizens,’ Ms Simpson said at the meeting, after leading the party room in singing the anthem.

Similarly, former state candidate Pinky Singh said singing the anthem daily would help to foster unity among children and their peers, regardless of race or religion. 

These LNP members are calling on the state opposition to ‘adopt a policy that would mandate the singing of the National Anthem at the beginning of the school day for all schools’.

It comes amid claims some schools across the nation do not ever sing the anthem. It is standard practice for most schools to sing the song weekly – normally during an assembly or parade day.

Schoolchildren as young as five could soon be expected to sing the national anthem every day before starting class

Schoolchildren as young as five could soon be expected to sing the national anthem every day before starting class

The anthem has been a point of contention for years and caused heartache for some of the indigenous population in particular. Many feel the lyrics do not accurately represent them and their heritage. 

The critics have long claimed that describing Australia as a ‘young nation’ in the line ‘we are young and free’ overlooks the fact Aboriginal people have lived on the continent for tens of thousands of years.

The controversial lyrics have sparked public protests, with national sporting events typically at the forefront of debate around changing the national anthem.

Last year, half of the indigenous team refused to sing the Australian national anthem played in the lead up to the NRL game against the Indigenous All Stars and Maori All Stars.

Fiona Simpson, MP for Maroochydore on the Sunshine Coast, said such a policy could help to foster strong 'national identity' in Australian youth

Fiona Simpson, MP for Maroochydore on the Sunshine Coast, said such a policy could help to foster strong ‘national identity’ in Australian youth

NEW AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL ANTHEM 

Australians all let us rejoice,

For we are one and free;

We’ve golden soil and wealth for toil;

Our home is girt by sea;

Our land abounds in nature’s gifts Of beauty rich and rare;

In history’s page, let every stage Advance Australia Fair.

In joyful strains then let us sing, Advance Australia Fair.

Beneath our radiant Southern Cross We’ll toil with hearts and hands;

To make this Commonwealth of ours Renowned of all the lands;

For those who’ve come across the seas We’ve boundless plains to share;

With courage let us all combine To Advance Australia Fair.

In joyful strains then let us sing, Advance Australia Fair.

Nine Origin stars refused to sing the anthem before game one of 2019 series at Brisbane’s Suncorp Stadium, including Blues stars Cody Walker, Josh Addo-Carr, Latrell Mitchell, and Payne Haas.

Maroons stars Josh Papalii, Dane Gagai, Kalyn Ponga, Dylan Napa, and Will Chambers also boycotted the anthem.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on New Year’s Eve that the second line of the anthem, Advance Australia Fair, had been changed from ‘for we are young and free’ to ‘for we are one and free’.

‘While Australia as a modern nation may be relatively young, our country’s story is ancient, as are the stories of the many First Nations peoples whose stewardship we rightly acknowledge and respect,’ he said.

Governor-General David Hurley also agreed to a government recommendation to change the wording of the anthem.

Mr Morrison said the change was made to reflect all Australians.

‘During the past year we have showed once again the indomitable spirit of Australians and the united effort that has always enabled us to prevail as a nation,’ he said.

‘It is time to ensure this great unity is reflected more fully in our national anthem.’

Advance Australia Fair was composed by Peter Dodds McCormick and first performed in 1878. It was adopted as the national anthem in 1984.

Indigenous players refused to sing the national anthem in protest during State of Origin (Pictured left to right: Mitchell, Addo-Carr and Walker did not sing. They were joined by Payne Haas)

 Indigenous players refused to sing the national anthem in protest during State of Origin (Pictured left to right: Mitchell, Addo-Carr and Walker did not sing. They were joined by Payne Haas)

Advertisement





Source link

Spread the love

Written by bourbiza

Iraq PM unharmed after being targeted by drone attack

MPs and City figures voice concerns as inflation storm clouds gather