Covid-19 booster vaccines: Prime Minister holds hands with an 84-year-old grandmother


Heart-warming moment Prime Minister hold hands with an 84-year-old grandmother after getting their Covid booster shots together

  • Scott Morrison received his Covid-19 booster vaccine in Sydney on Friday
  • The Prime Minister was jabbed at the same time as 84-year-old Jane Malysiak 
  • The grandmother, 84, hit headlines for accidentally swearing at the cameras 










Scott Morrison has received his Covid-19 booster vaccine alongside the first Australian to get vaccinated.

The Prime Minister was jabbed at the same time as 84-year-old Jane Malysiak, who migrated to Australia from Poland after World War II.

The grandmother hit headlines for accidentally swearing at the cameras while trying to make a peace sign after her first jab at Castle Hill Medical Centre in Sydney’s north-west in February. 

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison receives his COVID-19 booster vaccination at Kildare Road Medical Centre in Blacktown in Sydney

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison receives his COVID-19 booster vaccination at Kildare Road Medical Centre in Blacktown in Sydney

After receiving their booster shots, Mr Morrison and Ms Malysiak walked into a waiting room for 15 minutes of observation.  

The Prime Minister said ‘take my hand’ as Ms Malysiak got up from her chair and the pair walked arm in arm.

All Australians over 18 can get a booster shot at least six months after their second dose. 

The booster is Pfizer regardless of which vaccine the patient took before. 

After receiving their booster shots, Mr Morrison and Ms Malysiak walked into a waiting room for 15 minutes of observation

After receiving their booster shots, Mr Morrison and Ms Malysiak walked into a waiting room for 15 minutes of observation

Jane Malysiak hit headlines for accidentally swearing while trying to make a peace sign after her jab at Castle Hill Medical Centre in Sydney in February (pictured above)

Jane Malysiak hit headlines for accidentally swearing while trying to make a peace sign after her jab at Castle Hill Medical Centre in Sydney in February (pictured above)

After her first vaccination in February Ms Malysiak was posing for photos when Mr Morrison encouraged her to give a peace sign for the cameras, telling her it means ‘V for vaccine’.

But Ms Malysiak inadvertently threw up the universal sign for ‘up yours’ by turning her hand the other way around. 

Photographers, health workers and reporters erupted into laughter, before Mr Morrison quickly pushed Ms Malysiak’s hand down, jokingly telling her ‘always front, always front’. 

Why are boosters being offered? 

Overseas data showed the effectiveness of Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines at stopping infections decreases over time. 

A study in the UK in August showed two doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine were 88 per cent effective at stopping infection after one month but that dropped to 74 per cent after five months. 

The effectiveness of AstraZeneca dropped from 77 to 67 per cent. 

Pfizer says its booster can restore effectiveness to 96 per cent.

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Written by bourbiza

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