Double child killer Colin Pitchfork is arrested and sent BACK to prison over ‘concerning behaviour’


Double child killer Colin Pitchfork has been arrested and recalled to prison, the Ministry of Justice said, after he was released two months ago.

Pitchfork, now 61, was arrested by police officers for ‘concerning behaviour’ and taken in for processing just two months after he was freed after 33 years in prison.

Under the cover of darkness, the sexual predator was taken from Leyhill open prison, in Tortworth, Gloucs., to a hostel in the south of England, where he was greeted by other residents and staff. 

In September, it was revealed he had been placed near three schools and two nurseries, with pictures showing him prowling the streets as a free man.

Pitchfork, who was imprisoned for life in 1988 for the rape and murder of two 15-year-old girls, is facing a standard recall – which in theory means he could be re-released into public life again in 28 days. 

But sources told the Sun his past life of crime means he is almost guaranteed an audience before an official Parole Board hearing within the next six months to determine his fate.

The source said it could be ‘years’ before he was released into public life again, adding: ‘Pitchfork’s licence conditions were so tough that if he stepped out of line he faced recall.  

‘Now he has done just that. His behaviour caused great concern and that was behind it.

‘He kept going for long walks alone which in itself was alarming. It’s thought his attitude and fears he was hiding things were also a problem.’

A mugshot of Colin Pitchfork, the first murderer convicted and jailed using DNA evidence

A mugshot of Colin Pitchfork, the first murderer convicted and jailed using DNA evidence

Pitchfork raped and strangled Lynda Mann (right) in Narborough, Leicestershire, in November 1983 and raped and murdered Dawn Ashworth (left) three years later in the nearby village of Enderby

Pitchfork raped and strangled Lynda Mann (right) in Narborough, Leicestershire, in November 1983 and raped and murdered Dawn Ashworth (left) three years later in the nearby village of Enderby

Pitchfork strangled his first victim Lynda Mann, in Narborough, Leicestershire, in November 1983. He killed Dawn Ashworth three years later in the neighbouring village of Enderby. 

He became the first person to be convicted using DNA evidence after he had tried to evade capture by persuading a work colleague to take a blood test for him during the murder hunt.

Pitchfork was freed after the Parole Board rejected the Government and his devastated victims’ families’ legal challenge. 

In a clear indication of the threat he still posed, he was subject to some of the strictest licence conditions ever set.

The killer will wear an electronic tag so he can be monitored at all times, banned from going near the relatives of his victims and face restrictions on using the internet by himself.

He may also face spot lie detector tests to see whether he has broken any conditions.

Pitchfork’s early release from a life sentence in the summer prompted furious relatives of his victims to speak out.

Barbara Ashworth, the mother of Pitchfork’s second victim Dawn Ashworth, said: ‘This man should not be breathing the same air as us. He should not be walking the streets again.’ 

Convicted double child killer Colin Pitchfork was spotted going for a stroll in a park near young families. The 61-year-old predator was handed a life sentence in 1988 for the rape and murder of two 15-year-old girls

Convicted double child killer Colin Pitchfork was spotted going for a stroll in a park near young families. The 61-year-old predator was handed a life sentence in 1988 for the rape and murder of two 15-year-old girls

Rebecca Eastwood, the sister of Pitchfork’s first victim Lynda Mann (pictured), said: ‘Why has he been placed near a number of schools? I just hope the pictures will mean people will now be able to be on their guard.’

Rebecca Eastwood, the sister of Pitchfork’s first victim Lynda Mann (pictured), said: ‘Why has he been placed near a number of schools? I just hope the pictures will mean people will now be able to be on their guard.’

The families of both victims have accused the Parole Board of putting children at risk by ignoring concerns from experts, especially over Pitchfork’s ‘future sexual interests’. Pictured: Pitchfork's second victim Dawn Ashworth

The families of both victims have accused the Parole Board of putting children at risk by ignoring concerns from experts, especially over Pitchfork’s ‘future sexual interests’. Pictured: Pitchfork’s second victim Dawn Ashworth

Rebecca Eastwood, the sister of Pitchfork’s first victim Lynda Mann, said: ‘Why has he been placed near a number of schools? I just hope the pictures will mean people will now be able to be on their guard.’

Miss Eastwood, of Liverpool, added: ‘Please remember his face and stay clear of him and keep your children safe. There is no way a man who committed these crimes can change.’

The families of both victims have accused the Parole Board of putting children at risk by ignoring concerns from experts, especially over Pitchfork’s ‘future sexual interests’.

How a revolutionary DNA trial helped to snare child killer Colin Pitchfork

DNA evidence – then in its early use in criminal cases – played a key role in solving the murders of Lynda Mann and Dawn Ashworth.

It was first used in the investigation following the death of Pitchfork’s first victim – Lynda Mann.

Then 15, Lynda was grabbed, raped and murdered as she walked home from babysitting earlier that day.

DNA was used at the start of the investigation, when a sample of semen taken from her body was found to be from a person with type-A blood.

It also matched an enzyme profile of just 10 per cent of males.

Volunteers taking tests in 1987 to help police find the murderer of Lynda Mann and Dawn Ashworth

Volunteers taking tests in 1987 to help police find the murderer of Lynda Mann and Dawn Ashworth

But with few leads and no direct suspects, police left the case open.

In 1986, a second 15-year-old girl, Dawn Ashworth, left her home to visit a friend’s house.

When she did not return, a search was launched and, like Lynda, her body was found having been raped.

Police again found similar DNA, and with the murder having been carried out in a similar way, detectives realised they were looking for a double murderer.

Officers had another suspect in mind at the time, Richard Buckland – a 17-year-old with learning difficulties who had confessed to the second murder and had knowledge of the first. He would later be exonerated.

But it wasn’t until Sir Alec Jeffreys, a genetics researcher at nearby Leicester University, became involved that his innocence was proved. 

Sir Alec first developed genetic profiling along with Peter Gill and Dave Werrett.

And he used it to compare DNA samples found on both bodies.

It proved the killer was the same person – but not Buckland.

Later, police launched a DNA drive and up to 5,000 men in three villages were asked to volunteer blood or saliva samples.

However, no matches were found.

But in 1987 a bakery colleague of Pitchfork was overheard boasting how he was set to receive £200 to pose as Pitchfork and give a sample.

The conversation was reported to the police and Pitchfork was later arrested. 



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