TV fishing host Paul Worsteling is struck by lighting while filming


Scary moment TV fishing host is struck by lighting while filming on a boat: ‘I can hear the static crackling in the air’

  • Experienced fishing show host Paul Worsteling shocked by lightning on boat 
  • The 48-year-old shared a clip of the moment to YouTube in last week 
  • While fishing off Victoria, storm rolls over and air ‘crackles’ with static charge










The moment an Australian fishing show host is struck by lightning while casting his rod on a fishing boat has been caught on video. 

Paul Worsteling is a familiar face to most fishing fans having featured on the angling show Escape with ET, co-presented Rex Hunt’s Fishing Adventures and fronted his own program IFISH for more than a decade. 

The 48-year old was fishing off Victoria’s coast with his son Jett when a storm swept over, filling the air with so much static electricity that his line ‘rose up into the air like a rainbow’. 

Paul Worsteling (pictured with his wife Cristy) is a popular Australian fishing show host having fronted television programs for more than a decade

Paul Worsteling (pictured with his wife Cristy) is a popular Australian fishing show host having fronted television programs for more than a decade

‘My line is coming off the rod tip going up 15 metres in the air like a big bow and then into the water.’ he says in the video uploaded to YouTube last week. 

‘I can hear the static crackling in the air.’

The boat appears to be a few hundred metres off shore and lightning can be seen in the distance as storm clouds roll over. 

Mr Worsteling then casts his line into water and immediately violently jolts back. 

‘Just drop it (the rod),’ his son yells. 

‘Did you hear that. I wasn’t carrying on I promise – I just got electrocuted,’ he replies.

The angler casts while off the Victorian coast and is immediately shocked by lightning (pictured)

The angler casts while off the Victorian coast and is immediately shocked by lightning (pictured) 

He explains as the line flies through the air it appears to be generating electricity from the air and channeling it back into the rod, rather than a current from the water.

He then cast his rod again and observes the line ‘just keeps going straight up into the air’. 

‘I’ve never seen anything like it,’ he adds.

‘Electricity is scary, I’m not touching that,’ his son remarks.

The pair then continue to fish rather than heading back to shore as the the storm itself misses them – with the younger Worsteling managing to reel in a gigantic snapper. 

Some commenters said they’d experienced a similar phenomenon. 

‘I’ve had this happen several times fishing plastics for snapper while a thunder storm approaches. The braid just takes off into the air, usually the fish go nuts though. Dangerous but great fun,’ one said.

‘Happened to me a before and even heard a buzzing noise from my reel,’ added another.

Mr Worsteling and his son didn't turn back to shore but kept fishing, reeling in a massive snapper (pictured)

Mr Worsteling and his son didn’t turn back to shore but kept fishing, reeling in a massive snapper (pictured) 

According to NASA, static electricity in the air causes lightning, which is in effect a giant static electrical spark jumping from cloud to cloud or from a cloud to the earth. 

Grant Kirkby, a specialist in lightning risk mitigation, previously told the ABC being on or in the water in a storm is ‘one of the most dangerous places you can be’. 

He said if you are in a small tinnie not much can be done to mitigate a lightning strike, though some larger yachts have earthing points that can direct the charge safely away.

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Written by Bourbiza Mohamed

A technology enthusiast and a passionate writer in the field of information technology, cyber security, and blockchain

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